Gravity Liberty Road Bike Review

You can only make so much money by selling bike parts. The big paydays are in the sale of bicycles (especially when you own the brand.)

Bikes Direct is a savvy player to this game. They understand that cyclists want an affordable bike option. And, thanks to the huge volumes of bike parts that they sell, they can negotiate impressive pricing on their in-house bike brands.

Enter Gravity, one of the popular bike brands that Bikes Direct owns.

The Gravity Liberty is a reliable option for a road bike. This Liberty model is a flat handlebar road bike option that is ideal for new riders to the sport or for those who want the perfect city bicycle.

Frame

Most of these have an aluminum frame, which is simple, but durable and affordable. They’ve incorporated an oval downtube design which lends a slight bit of aerodynamics as well as some added rigidity for power transfer.

Fork

The front fork is carbon fiber — a nice feature that you don’t typically find without spending a much larger sum of money. Carbon fiber forks smooth the ride thanks to the inherent properties of carbon. The fiberglass and Kevlar combined with the resin help to absorb the road vibrations and keep from transferring those vibrations from the road up to the rider’s arms.

The result is a much more comfortable ride.

Brakes

You’ll notice the disc brakes. I like the disc brakes for improved stopping in wet conditions. I don’t feel like these are a deal-breaker (no pun intended), but they can improve the overall experience.

Wheels

They skimp here. You get a deep dish 30mm wheel, but they don’t appear to be double walled. I’m a big fan of double-walled wheels as they can take so much more of a beating than single-walled rims.

The deeper rim might help with that a little bit, but you are still fighting the need for protection from hitting a rut.

I’d save up another $200 over the first year of owning this machine and upgrade them after riding the stock wheels for awhile.

Overall, I think this ride is a solid value. Unless you want to spend an extra $200 or $300 upfront to find better wheels, you are going to be hard-pressed to find a better kit for the money.